Christ & Culture Revisited

By D. A. Carson

Description

Called to live in the world, but not to be of it, Christians must maintain a balancing act that becomes more precarious the further our culture departs from its Judeo-Christian roots. How should members of the church interact with such a culture, especially as deeply enmeshed as most of us have become?

D. A. Carson applies his masterful touch to this problem. He begins by exploring the classic typology of H. Richard Niebuhr and his five options for understanding culture. Carson proposes that these disparate options are in reality one still larger vision. Using the Bible’s own story line and the categories of biblical theology, he attempts to work out what that unifying vision is. Carson acknowledges the helpfulness of Niebuhr’s grid and other similar matrices but warns against giving them canonical force.

Recommendations

“There is no more crucial issue facing us today than the relationship of the church and the gospel to contemporary culture. Don Carson’s treatment of this issue is the most balanced one out there. Rather than grinding an ax or pushing his own paradigm, he listens carefully to the Scripture and brings us in the end to a sophisticated simplicity about these matters. I highly recommended this book.
– Tim Keller, Pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York City; Author of The Reason for God: Belief in the Age of Skepticism.

“Don Carson here writes clearly, carefully, and helpfully about the timely topic of how Christians should engage culture. Well-suited to write such a volume, Carson exposes and explodes ‘egregious reductionisms’ whic he says too often afflict Christians. We can’t reduce the relationship of Christ and culture to one model (Niebuhrian or otherwise). Reading this book has sharpened my own understanding. So buy the book you’re holding. Read it. Pass it along to folks in your congregation. And reduce ‘egregious redutionisms’!”
– Mark Dever, Pastor of Capitol Hill baptist Church, Washington D. C.; Founder of 9marks.org.

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